FOUNDATIONAL SHARING:  Visioned by Aldrin Valdez, Foundational Sharing was / is a publication and performing platform for and by community. Aldrin and I did / do share text with each other that inspires us. We then pass(ed) it on to artists we love to contextualize in relationship with their own practice. Then, in a cozy location, we invite friends and other love ones to hear the artists share, and we present the texts in zine form.    MORE INFO     

FOUNDATIONAL SHARING: Visioned by Aldrin Valdez, Foundational Sharing was / is a publication and performing platform for and by community. Aldrin and I did / do share text with each other that inspires us. We then pass(ed) it on to artists we love to contextualize in relationship with their own practice. Then, in a cozy location, we invite friends and other love ones to hear the artists share, and we present the texts in zine form. MORE INFO
 

  NEW YORK CITY TRANS ORAL HISTORY PROJECT:  a community archive devoted to the collection, preservation and sharing of trans histories, organized in collaboration with the New York Public Library.I have done a few interviews, and help a bit with planning.(image: roanboucher.com)    MORE INFO

NEW YORK CITY TRANS ORAL HISTORY PROJECT: a community archive devoted to the collection, preservation and sharing of trans histories, organized in collaboration with the New York Public Library.I have done a few interviews, and help a bit with planning.(image: roanboucher.com) MORE INFO

  WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO?:  A collective of folks joined in response to the ongoing AIDS Crisis who understand a doula is someone in community who holds space for others during times of transition. For us, HIV is a series of transitions in someone's life that does not start with with being tested nor end with getting on treatment or death. Foundational to our process is asking questions. Proud to be a founding member.    MORE INFO

WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO?: A collective of folks joined in response to the ongoing AIDS Crisis who understand a doula is someone in community who holds space for others during times of transition. For us, HIV is a series of transitions in someone's life that does not start with with being tested nor end with getting on treatment or death. Foundational to our process is asking questions. Proud to be a founding member. MORE INFO

  TIME IN NOT A LINE:  In 2015 I invited a group of folks interested in exploring what is needed within the ongoing HIV/AIDS movement  for a day long discussion building on the 2014 WE WHO FEEL DIFFERENTLY journal issue I edited. One of the three sessions we had was entitled: WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO? Building on the growing role doulas are playing in birth, death, abortion, gender transition, and other important life moments , the gathered group wondered if there wasn't a role for doulas to play in the lives of people living with HIV and those made most at risk? The discussion lead to the creation of the WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO? collective. The day of discussionswas supported by the Department of Art & Public Policy, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.    HERE FOR A TRANSCRIPT AND IMAGES OF THE DISCUSSION

TIME IN NOT A LINE: In 2015 I invited a group of folks interested in exploring what is needed within the ongoing HIV/AIDS movement  for a day long discussion building on the 2014 WE WHO FEEL DIFFERENTLY journal issue I edited. One of the three sessions we had was entitled: WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO? Building on the growing role doulas are playing in birth, death, abortion, gender transition, and other important life moments , the gathered group wondered if there wasn't a role for doulas to play in the lives of people living with HIV and those made most at risk? The discussion lead to the creation of the WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO? collective. The day of discussionswas supported by the Department of Art & Public Policy, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. HERE FOR A TRANSCRIPT AND IMAGES OF THE DISCUSSION

  HIV WITH:   was a five-part writing workshop series I organized in the spring of 2017 for WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO? with the support of POETS & WRITERS that brought together writers, care givers, and others living with HIV and impacted by the epidemic to share their experiences and skills. The workshops were free and open to the public. Some experience with HIV and a desire to write was all you need to participate. Workshops included: WRITING WITH TRAUMA with Jennifer Patterson + Michael Crumpler at Judson Church; BEYOND PUBLIC HEALTH with Joseph Osmundson + Lodz Joseph at HousingWorks; THE SPIRIT AND THE STATE with iele paloumpis + Timothy DuWhite at The New School; El VIH Y Yo with Miguel Caballero + Tamara Oyola Santiago + Diana Cage at BOOM Health; WITNESS with Cat Fitzpatrick and Christopher Jones at Union Theological Seminary. (question posed by Timothy DuWhite)    MORE INFO

HIV WITH:  was a five-part writing workshop series I organized in the spring of 2017 for WHAT WOULD AN HIV DOULA DO? with the support of POETS & WRITERS that brought together writers, care givers, and others living with HIV and impacted by the epidemic to share their experiences and skills. The workshops were free and open to the public. Some experience with HIV and a desire to write was all you need to participate. Workshops included: WRITING WITH TRAUMA with Jennifer Patterson + Michael Crumpler at Judson Church; BEYOND PUBLIC HEALTH with Joseph Osmundson + Lodz Joseph at HousingWorks; THE SPIRIT AND THE STATE with iele paloumpis + Timothy DuWhite at The New School; El VIH Y Yo with Miguel Caballero + Tamara Oyola Santiago + Diana Cage at BOOM Health; WITNESS with Cat Fitzpatrick and Christopher Jones at Union Theological Seminary. (question posed by Timothy DuWhite) MORE INFO

  TIME IS NOT A LINE: CONVERSATIONS, ESSAYS and IMAGES ABOUT HIV/AIDS NOW:  Issue 3, Fall 2014 edition of Carlos Motta's We Who Feel Differently Journal, which I edited. Featuring: Xaviera Simmons, Pato Hebert, Cyd Nova, Aimar Arriola, Kenyon Farrow, Nathan Lee, Carlos Motta and Bryn Kelly.    MORE INFO

TIME IS NOT A LINE: CONVERSATIONS, ESSAYS and IMAGES ABOUT HIV/AIDS NOW: Issue 3, Fall 2014 edition of Carlos Motta's We Who Feel Differently Journal, which I edited. Featuring: Xaviera Simmons, Pato Hebert, Cyd Nova, Aimar Arriola, Kenyon Farrow, Nathan Lee, Carlos Motta and Bryn Kelly. MORE INFO

  “Forgetting ACT UP”:  In her essay “Forgetting ACT UP”(Quarterly Journal of Speech, 2012), filmmaker, activist and academic Alexandra Juhasz explores the idea that, “When ACT UP is remembered—again and again and again—other places, people, and forms of AIDS activism are disremembered.” At this 2015 event at the Bureau for General Service: Queer Division,  I facilitated a discussion in which attendees explored Juhasz’s essay, as well as discussed what her argument meant at the moment when some responses to early AIDS activism are being remembered, while much of what has happened has yet to be remembered, reclaimed, and acknowledged. How does this lack of remembering fit into discussion and action around #blacklivesmatter and how does it impact work being done presently around HIV/AIDS?

“Forgetting ACT UP”: In her essay “Forgetting ACT UP”(Quarterly Journal of Speech, 2012), filmmaker, activist and academic Alexandra Juhasz explores the idea that, “When ACT UP is remembered—again and again and again—other places, people, and forms of AIDS activism are disremembered.” At this 2015 event at the Bureau for General Service: Queer Division,  I facilitated a discussion in which attendees explored Juhasz’s essay, as well as discussed what her argument meant at the moment when some responses to early AIDS activism are being remembered, while much of what has happened has yet to be remembered, reclaimed, and acknowledged. How does this lack of remembering fit into discussion and action around #blacklivesmatter and how does it impact work being done presently around HIV/AIDS?

 WISH YOU WERE: LETTERS TO ROBERT RAYFORD, MICHAEL BROWN, MICHAEL JOHNSON: Hosted at the legendary MoKaBe's Coffeehouse in the summer of 2015 this event organized by me, Joss Barton, and Maurice Tracy,  was an opportunity to make connections between various forms of state violence and to reflect on what the loss of life and freedom means for individuals and the community as a whole. WISH YOU WERE HERE was both a sentiment directed at Rayford, Brown, and Johnson, and for justice. (photo by Jun Bae).    MORE INFO

WISH YOU WERE: LETTERS TO ROBERT RAYFORD, MICHAEL BROWN, MICHAEL JOHNSON: Hosted at the legendary MoKaBe's Coffeehouse in the summer of 2015 this event organized by me, Joss Barton, and Maurice Tracy,  was an opportunity to make connections between various forms of state violence and to reflect on what the loss of life and freedom means for individuals and the community as a whole. WISH YOU WERE HERE was both a sentiment directed at Rayford, Brown, and Johnson, and for justice. (photo by Jun Bae). MORE INFO

  MIKE ALBO and BRONTEZ PURNELL: JOHNNY WOULD YOU LOVE ME IF MY DICK WAS A HORNITO?:  In the fall of 2015 I worked with the Bureau of General Services Queer Division and Lambda Literary to host a conversation between writers and heartthrobs Brontez Purnell and Mike Albo. Brontez read from his recently released book at the time,  Johnny Would you Love Me If My Dick Were Bigger . Albo read from his then soon to be released Kindle Single,  Spermhood , which would go on to become a one man show. William Johnson from Lambda and I moderated conversation with the authors after their reading.    READ PART OF THAT DISCUSSION   . 

MIKE ALBO and BRONTEZ PURNELL: JOHNNY WOULD YOU LOVE ME IF MY DICK WAS A HORNITO?: In the fall of 2015 I worked with the Bureau of General Services Queer Division and Lambda Literary to host a conversation between writers and heartthrobs Brontez Purnell and Mike Albo. Brontez read from his recently released book at the time, Johnny Would you Love Me If My Dick Were Bigger. Albo read from his then soon to be released Kindle Single, Spermhood, which would go on to become a one man show. William Johnson from Lambda and I moderated conversation with the authors after their reading. READ PART OF THAT DISCUSSION

  BREAKING INTO HISTORY: AIDS, the ARCHIVE and the FIGHT AGAINST the CANONIZATION of an ONGOING EPIDEMIC : .For the April 2016 conference Queer Circuits in Archival Times, I put together a panel to explore how in recent years video, visual art, storytelling, printed material, literature, medical records, performance, gossip, online registries and other queer sources of sharing have been used to tell early stories of HIV/AIDS in the US and how even still there is still too narrow of a story being told about HIV. This canonization stemming from the archive and networked ways of knowing limit not only how we understand the past, but how we act in the present and imagine the future. On the panel were filmmaker Tiona McClodden; media maker and theorist Julian DeMayo and academic Ian Bradely-Perrin.     MORE INFO   . 

BREAKING INTO HISTORY: AIDS, the ARCHIVE and the FIGHT AGAINST the CANONIZATION of an ONGOING EPIDEMIC: .For the April 2016 conference Queer Circuits in Archival Times, I put together a panel to explore how in recent years video, visual art, storytelling, printed material, literature, medical records, performance, gossip, online registries and other queer sources of sharing have been used to tell early stories of HIV/AIDS in the US and how even still there is still too narrow of a story being told about HIV. This canonization stemming from the archive and networked ways of knowing limit not only how we understand the past, but how we act in the present and imagine the future. On the panel were filmmaker Tiona McClodden; media maker and theorist Julian DeMayo and academic Ian Bradely-Perrin.  MORE INFO

  HAVE YOU BEEN VULNERABLE TODAY?  Seasoned activists Rusti Miller-Hill, Dethress Ulmer-Lesley and Fortunata Kasege offered powerful views of the ongoing HIV crisis. The welcoming and participatory gathering found the women leading a discussion around intimate partner violence, incarceration re-entry, trauma, parenthood, faith and disclosure. Active in this conversation were ideas around unity, community and disclosure. Have you been vulnerable today? How have you been made vulnerable? How do you act in solidarity? What is at stake for you? What does love in action look like for you? I organized the event with members of the Positive Women's Network including Miller-Hill, Ulmer-Lesley and Olivia Ford, April 2015. 

HAVE YOU BEEN VULNERABLE TODAY? Seasoned activists Rusti Miller-Hill, Dethress Ulmer-Lesley and Fortunata Kasege offered powerful views of the ongoing HIV crisis. The welcoming and participatory gathering found the women leading a discussion around intimate partner violence, incarceration re-entry, trauma, parenthood, faith and disclosure. Active in this conversation were ideas around unity, community and disclosure. Have you been vulnerable today? How have you been made vulnerable? How do you act in solidarity? What is at stake for you? What does love in action look like for you? I organized the event with members of the Positive Women's Network including Miller-Hill, Ulmer-Lesley and Olivia Ford, April 2015. 

  MOBILIZING NEW YORK: AIDS, Antipoverity and Feminist Activism A Conversation between Tamar Carroll and Kenyon Farrow : A reading and discussion event I organized in 2015 at Bluestockings that brought together two powerful voices. Each read recent work related to social justice and HIV/AIDS, followed by an enlightening conversation. Transcript is forthcoming. 

MOBILIZING NEW YORK: AIDS, Antipoverity and Feminist Activism A Conversation between Tamar Carroll and Kenyon Farrow: A reading and discussion event I organized in 2015 at Bluestockings that brought together two powerful voices. Each read recent work related to social justice and HIV/AIDS, followed by an enlightening conversation. Transcript is forthcoming. 

  DEVIANT PLAYS:  A public discussion about sex, art, community and taking health and representation into one's own hands that Started with performances and presentations from Kia Labejia, Timothy DuWhite, and Chaplin Christopher Jones. As the night progressed the event became an open forum for people under-served, not served, and/or not relying on traditional means of health promotion, AIDS awareness, and other life enhancing information and education. Created and facilitated by me and Zachary Frater for Visual AIDS, May 2014.    MORE INFO

DEVIANT PLAYS: A public discussion about sex, art, community and taking health and representation into one's own hands that Started with performances and presentations from Kia Labejia, Timothy DuWhite, and Chaplin Christopher Jones. As the night progressed the event became an open forum for people under-served, not served, and/or not relying on traditional means of health promotion, AIDS awareness, and other life enhancing information and education. Created and facilitated by me and Zachary Frater for Visual AIDS, May 2014. MORE INFO

  (RE)PRESENTING AIDS: CULTURE and ACCOUNTABILITY:  Inspired by Hugh Ryan's NY TIMES op-ed,  How to Whitewash a Plague , for Visual AIDS I worked with the Pop-Up Museum of Queer History and CLAGS to present a public forum in August 2014 which explored the role museums, galleries and cultural institutions play, and can play, when presenting exhibitions related to HIV/AIDS. This forum included voices involved in the curation, marketing and administration of AIDS related exhibitions, as well as artists, critics, and others with an invested interest. The evening was an interactive discussion with an opportunity to consider the needs and wants related to an exhibition about HIV/AIDS. It was moderator by Ann Northrop. Speakers were: Jason Baumann, Collections Strategy/LGBT Collections, New York Public Library; Kia Benbow, Artist, grenAIDS; Jim Hubbard, Filmmaker, United in Anger; Karl McCool, Assistant Director, Dirty Looks; Kris Nuzzi, Curator, Not Over; Hunter O'Hanian, Museum Director, Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art; Edwin Ramoran, Manager of Public Programs and Community Engagement, The Studio Museum in Harlem; Hugh Ryan, Writer, Founding Director of the Pop-Up Museum of Queer History; Amy Sadao, The Daniel W. Dietrich, II Director, Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania; and Nelson Santos, Executive Director, Visual AIDS.    TRANSCRIPTS AND MORE INFO. 

(RE)PRESENTING AIDS: CULTURE and ACCOUNTABILITY: Inspired by Hugh Ryan's NY TIMES op-ed, How to Whitewash a Plague, for Visual AIDS I worked with the Pop-Up Museum of Queer History and CLAGS to present a public forum in August 2014 which explored the role museums, galleries and cultural institutions play, and can play, when presenting exhibitions related to HIV/AIDS. This forum included voices involved in the curation, marketing and administration of AIDS related exhibitions, as well as artists, critics, and others with an invested interest. The evening was an interactive discussion with an opportunity to consider the needs and wants related to an exhibition about HIV/AIDS. It was moderator by Ann Northrop. Speakers were: Jason Baumann, Collections Strategy/LGBT Collections, New York Public Library; Kia Benbow, Artist, grenAIDS; Jim Hubbard, Filmmaker, United in Anger; Karl McCool, Assistant Director, Dirty Looks; Kris Nuzzi, Curator, Not Over; Hunter O'Hanian, Museum Director, Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art; Edwin Ramoran, Manager of Public Programs and Community Engagement, The Studio Museum in Harlem; Hugh Ryan, Writer, Founding Director of the Pop-Up Museum of Queer History; Amy Sadao, The Daniel W. Dietrich, II Director, Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania; and Nelson Santos, Executive Director, Visual AIDS. TRANSCRIPTS AND MORE INFO. 

  LIFE CHANCES: HIV CRIMINALIZATION + TRANS POLITICS:  Life Chances, examined discriminatory laws and regulations such as "stop and frisk" and "condoms as evidence", disclosure, and other rules, systems and norms that reduce life chances for trans people and/or people who are living with HIV. In this conversation, Che Gossett, Dean Spade, Mitchyll Mora and Sean Strub discussed issues related to trans politics and HIV criminalization, activism, resistance and social justice. The conversation was hosted by Laverne Cox. The event was organized by myself, Cassidy Gardner from QUEEROCRACY, with help from Reina Gossett and people at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project and the Sex Worker Outreach Project New York . The poster was created by Kenny O, Julie Blair and Tom Léger. (Transcription forthcoming)    MORE INFO ON THE POSTER   .  

LIFE CHANCES: HIV CRIMINALIZATION + TRANS POLITICS: Life Chances, examined discriminatory laws and regulations such as "stop and frisk" and "condoms as evidence", disclosure, and other rules, systems and norms that reduce life chances for trans people and/or people who are living with HIV. In this conversation, Che Gossett, Dean Spade, Mitchyll Mora and Sean Strub discussed issues related to trans politics and HIV criminalization, activism, resistance and social justice. The conversation was hosted by Laverne Cox. The event was organized by myself, Cassidy Gardner from QUEEROCRACY, with help from Reina Gossett and people at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project and the Sex Worker Outreach Project New York . The poster was created by Kenny O, Julie Blair and Tom Léger. (Transcription forthcoming) MORE INFO ON THE POSTER.  

  WHAT YOU DON'T KNOW COULD FILL A MUSEUM: AIDS, Art, and the Institution.  Wanting to continue the conversation started in August 2014, while working at Visual AIDS I organized a follow up discussion  for the Brooklyn Museum, featuring academic Tara Burk; filmmaker Jean Carlomusto; photographer Vincent Cianni; and writer Hugh Ryan. The event was moderated by activist and artist Brittany Duck.    TRANSCRIPT, IMAGES, MORE INFO. 

WHAT YOU DON'T KNOW COULD FILL A MUSEUM: AIDS, Art, and the Institution. Wanting to continue the conversation started in August 2014, while working at Visual AIDS I organized a follow up discussion  for the Brooklyn Museum, featuring academic Tara Burk; filmmaker Jean Carlomusto; photographer Vincent Cianni; and writer Hugh Ryan. The event was moderated by activist and artist Brittany Duck. TRANSCRIPT, IMAGES, MORE INFO. 

  THE PERSONAL and the POLITICAL: LOSING PARENTS TO AIDS:  Inspired by her own life and work of Sarah Schulman, writer Alysia Abbott approached Visual AIDS about creating an event around the children who have lost a parent to HIV/AIDS. The event was held in the winter of 2013 and featured Abbott, as well as Kia Labeija and Mathew Rodriguez The event was moderated by Schulman. Together the panelists and the room wrestled with the questions: What are the experiences of people whose parents died of AIDS? How do they understand these experiences? What do they need? Did their parents die of AIDS, or of government indifference and neglect? How can such a significant experience be brought to light in its range and scope and integrated into our understanding of the AIDS community?Abbott would then go on to work with Whitney Joiner to create The Recollectors.    HERE TO WATCH THE PANEL   . 

THE PERSONAL and the POLITICAL: LOSING PARENTS TO AIDS: Inspired by her own life and work of Sarah Schulman, writer Alysia Abbott approached Visual AIDS about creating an event around the children who have lost a parent to HIV/AIDS. The event was held in the winter of 2013 and featured Abbott, as well as Kia Labeija and Mathew Rodriguez The event was moderated by Schulman. Together the panelists and the room wrestled with the questions: What are the experiences of people whose parents died of AIDS? How do they understand these experiences? What do they need? Did their parents die of AIDS, or of government indifference and neglect? How can such a significant experience be brought to light in its range and scope and integrated into our understanding of the AIDS community?Abbott would then go on to work with Whitney Joiner to create The Recollectors. HERE TO WATCH THE PANEL

  YOUR NOSTALGIA IS KILLING ME AT THE NYPL:  In March 2014, while working at Visual AIDS, we partnered with  the New York Public Librarya conversation and public forum around the issues of nostalgia, art, AIDS and representation with artists, writers, activists, and other members of the public. The event began with a discussion between "Your Nostalgia Is Killing Me" poster creators Vincent Chevalier and Ian Bradley-Perrin, along with artist Avram Finkelstein, and writer John Weir. The event was moderated by Patrick "Pato" Hebert based on a format designed by himself and organizer/activist Tamara Oyola Santiago in discussion with Visual AIDS. The panel discussion was followed by small group break out sessions (facilitated by Oyola Santiago, Brittany Duck, Ella Boureau, and Ted Kerr) and then expanded into a large group discussion. Both the panel and large group discussion were recorded, which you can watch on    YouTube   .   MORE INFO and RELATED WRITING  . 

YOUR NOSTALGIA IS KILLING ME AT THE NYPL: In March 2014, while working at Visual AIDS, we partnered with  the New York Public Librarya conversation and public forum around the issues of nostalgia, art, AIDS and representation with artists, writers, activists, and other members of the public. The event began with a discussion between "Your Nostalgia Is Killing Me" poster creators Vincent Chevalier and Ian Bradley-Perrin, along with artist Avram Finkelstein, and writer John Weir. The event was moderated by Patrick "Pato" Hebert based on a format designed by himself and organizer/activist Tamara Oyola Santiago in discussion with Visual AIDS. The panel discussion was followed by small group break out sessions (facilitated by Oyola Santiago, Brittany Duck, Ella Boureau, and Ted Kerr) and then expanded into a large group discussion. Both the panel and large group discussion were recorded, which you can watch on YouTube. MORE INFO and RELATED WRITING

  IN CONVERSATION: DAVID FRANCE and JIM HUBBARD:  In March 2013,  Visual AIDS and The New School brought together directors David France ( How to Survive a Plague ) and Jim Hubbard ( United in Anger ) to discuss their films as part of a three part series we organized entitled  Revisiting the AIDS Crisis and the Ongoing Epidemic: Health Challenges in the 21st Century . Photo credit: Sam Feder.   WATCH THE CONVERSATION  .    MORE INFO    

IN CONVERSATION: DAVID FRANCE and JIM HUBBARD: In March 2013,  Visual AIDS and The New School brought together directors David France (How to Survive a Plague) and Jim Hubbard (United in Anger) to discuss their films as part of a three part series we organized entitled Revisiting the AIDS Crisis and the Ongoing Epidemic: Health Challenges in the 21st Century. Photo credit: Sam Feder. WATCH THE CONVERSATION. MORE INFO 

  TIME IS NOT A LINE: A PUBLIC CONVERSATION AROUND THE ANXIETY OF KNOWING, FORGETTING, HISTORY and LIVING:   Pato Hebert, Tamara Oyola Santiago and I conceived of this event as a place where people could: process the conversation that happened the day before between David France and Jim Hubbard;  talk about the ongoing impact of HIV/AIDS; and be in community with others who are trying to navigate the past, present and future. The event included small groups facilitated by students of Ricardo Montez and presentations from Julian DeMayo, Silas Howard and Tom Léger.    READ MORE   . 

TIME IS NOT A LINE: A PUBLIC CONVERSATION AROUND THE ANXIETY OF KNOWING, FORGETTING, HISTORY and LIVING:  Pato Hebert, Tamara Oyola Santiago and I conceived of this event as a place where people could: process the conversation that happened the day before between David France and Jim Hubbard;  talk about the ongoing impact of HIV/AIDS; and be in community with others who are trying to navigate the past, present and future. The event included small groups facilitated by students of Ricardo Montez and presentations from Julian DeMayo, Silas Howard and Tom Léger. READ MORE

  Dirty Looks On Location :  I curated 4 screenings the summer of 2015 for the biannual film and video event  including:  Breeden  with Vincent Chevalier in which we hosted multiple screenings of his film in a hotel room;  History Doesn't Have to Repeat Itself  with the filmmaker Stéphane Gérard at the Bronx Academy of Art and Dance;  She's A Talke r, a seldom seen short film by Neil Goldberg;  and  WAVE and Womanism  at Union Theological Seminary in which  We Care  by WAVE and  Villanelle  from Hyatt Hayat were screened.    MORE INFO

Dirty Looks On Location:  I curated 4 screenings the summer of 2015 for the biannual film and video event  including: Breeden with Vincent Chevalier in which we hosted multiple screenings of his film in a hotel room; History Doesn't Have to Repeat Itself with the filmmaker Stéphane Gérard at the Bronx Academy of Art and Dance; She's A Talker, a seldom seen short film by Neil Goldberg;  and WAVE and Womanism at Union Theological Seminary in which We Care by WAVE and Villanelle from Hyatt Hayat were screened. MORE INFO

  The Practice of Everyday Freedom: Richard Hudler and Rupert Raj:  Through artistic interpretations of archival material from the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives and the Pride Library from the University of Western Ontario, The Practice of Everyday Freedom was an exhibition and programming platform which celebrated and explored key contributions, moments, and accomplishments in the lives of Richard Hudler and Rupert Raj. The Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives were proud to welcome Richard Hudler and Rupert Raj into the National Portrait Collection, both trailblazers who have improved the life chances for LGBTQ+ Canadians. The exhibition featured newly commissioned portraits of the inductees by Maya Suess and Matthew Tarini. Curated by me and Aidan Cowling Spring 2013.    MORE INFO

The Practice of Everyday Freedom: Richard Hudler and Rupert Raj: Through artistic interpretations of archival material from the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives and the Pride Library from the University of Western Ontario, The Practice of Everyday Freedom was an exhibition and programming platform which celebrated and explored key contributions, moments, and accomplishments in the lives of Richard Hudler and Rupert Raj. The Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives were proud to welcome Richard Hudler and Rupert Raj into the National Portrait Collection, both trailblazers who have improved the life chances for LGBTQ+ Canadians. The exhibition featured newly commissioned portraits of the inductees by Maya Suess and Matthew Tarini. Curated by me and Aidan Cowling Spring 2013. MORE INFO

  The Purpose of Being Loud , 2009, screening Trevor Anderson's insta-classic, The Island, with Derek Jarmen's iconic BLUE. At the heart of both is isolation, HIV stigma, and desire to see and be seen. 

The Purpose of Being Loud, 2009, screening Trevor Anderson's insta-classic, The Island, with Derek Jarmen's iconic BLUE. At the heart of both is isolation, HIV stigma, and desire to see and be seen. 

  QUEER IMAGES, 2010 , Metro Cinema, Under the wonderful eyes of Marsh Murphy I had the opportunity to curate a few nights at Metro Cinema, including this screening:    QUEER IMAGES

QUEER IMAGES, 2010, Metro Cinema, Under the wonderful eyes of Marsh Murphy I had the opportunity to curate a few nights at Metro Cinema, including this screening: QUEER IMAGES